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Updated: 2 hours 58 min ago

Marijuana: Finding the right words for your teen

7 hours 44 min ago

At the Partnership, we’ve been talking a lot about marijuana. As you may know, we recently launched our new Marijuana Talk Kit, designed to help parents navigate the constantly evolving drug landscape and have productive conversations with their teens.

One way to set yourself up for a meaningful conversation – one during which your teen hears you and responds thoughtfully – is by knowing some words to use and avoid when talking with him about marijuana (or any issue). The Kit includes a chart of words to avoid, and helps you replace them with words to which your teen will better respond.

Take the word “but,” for example. “But” is a small word, but in using it, you risk shutting down a conversation. You might often catch yourself saying things like, “You did well on your report card, but I need you to do better.” Replacing “but” with another small word – “and” – can go a long way toward improving the outcome with your teen. “You did well on your report card, and I know you can do better.”

Why? A word like “but” can be polarizing and can have the unintended effect of negating and erasing everything that came before it. In the example, “You did well on your report card, but I need you to do better,” your teen will probably only hear “I need you to do better.” When you replace “but” with “and,” it acts as a better bridge between the two thoughts and communicates both points clearly to your teen – the praise and the areas in which you want him to improve.

The Kit is full of other examples of words to use and avoid – like “should” vs. “want”; “bad” vs. “harmful”; “disappointed” vs. “worried” and more.

Learn what words to use and avoid. Download your free Marijuana Talk Kit here >

The post Marijuana: Finding the right words for your teen appeared first on Partnership for Drug-Free Kids.

Categories: Bup Feeds

“But YOU smoked weed when YOU were younger.”

Wed, 03/25/2015 - 6:00am

“Marijuana is a plant. It’s natural. How harmful could it be?”

“But YOU smoked weed when YOU were younger.”

“Would you rather I drink alcohol? Weed is so much safer.”

Would you know what you’d say if confronted with these tough questions or arguments by your teen?

Marijuana is a hot topic. Between legalization in some states, the normalization of the drug in the media and pop culture and different ways of using (like “edible” cookies and candies, vaporizers and dabs), it’s becoming harder for parents to talk to teens about weed.

That’s why we created our new Marijuana Talk Kit. We want to help families navigate the changing marijuana landscape, and have productive, impactful conversations with their teens.

Inside the Talk Kit, you will find:

•Facts about marijuana
•Why marijuana is still risky for teens
•Ways to talk with your teen about marijuana
•What you should –  and shouldn’t –  say to your teen when talking about marijuana
•How to respond to your teen’s questions and arguments
•Resources to help

We know it’s hard, and we’re here to help.

The post “But YOU smoked weed when YOU were younger.” appeared first on Partnership for Drug-Free Kids.

Categories: Bup Feeds

How Do I Support My Teen’s Recovery after Addiction Treatment?

Mon, 03/09/2015 - 4:07pm

Many parents feel ill-prepared when their child has completed inpatient or outpatient drug addiction treatment. They often feel uncertain on what to expect and have many questions about how to best support their teen’s recovery.

Continuing Care, a website and guide (pdf), gives parents the tools and supports to make their families stronger and deal with the complex and challenging situations during the days, months and years after treatment.

You’ll find insights on how parents can set realistic expectations for their child’s recovery, including how to help them adapt to their new environment in sobriety, how to avoid the people, places and things that can trigger relapse and what to do if relapse occurs.

With good continuing care that is appropriately adjusted to individual needs, a teen should be able to manage his or her condition. Your child may initially need your help, but eventually he or she should be able to manage it without you, as he or she matures.

We hope this resource will help you figure out what might best support your recovery journey together.

The post How Do I Support My Teen’s Recovery after Addiction Treatment? appeared first on Partnership for Drug-Free Kids.

Categories: Bup Feeds