What DO I do with those extra meds? A few simple steps.

Drug and Alcohol News (JoinTogether.com) - Wed, 07/08/2015 - 4:13pm

Teen medicine abuse is an epidemic. That’s not our declaration; it’s that of the CDC, who doesn’t throw the term “epidemic” around loosely.  It’s no secret that this behavior is a problem (and a devastating one); what is sometimes confusing, though, is what you can do in your own home to prevent the behavior and protect your family.

At the Partnership, we know that kids and adults who intend to abuse are not only accessing medicine from their own homes, but they seek it at the homes of their friends’ parents; their grandparents; and others. Safeguarding and properly disposing of the medicine you keep at home is an action that everyone should take – regardless of whether or not you believe your teen or family is at risk.

So, how do you deal with those unwanted, expired or unused medicines in your home? Here are some simple steps to help clear up the confusion.

  1. The best and safest way to dispose of unwanted medicine is by finding a take-back location near you. The American Medicine Chest Challenge features a national directory of permanent prescription collection sites in every state across the country, so you can learn where to take your meds year round. The DEA also hosts national take-back days a few times per year. Either of these options are ideal ways of disposing of your medicine.
  2. If you can’t get to a take-back location and must dispose of your meds at home, it is best to crush them up and mix them with an undesirable substance – like coffee grounds or kitty litter – and throw the mixture in the trash. This makes pills less appealing and less recognizable to anyone who can see your trash – including your teens. Note: flushing your medicine is not advised and is dangerous, as it contaminates water and causes an environmental hazard.

Of course, many people have medicine at home that they are actively using, or need to keep at home for future use. If this is the case, be vigilant about counting your pills and safeguarding this medicine.

Finally, but perhaps most importantly, talk to your kids and family about the dangers of abusing medicine. For more information on how you can help #EndMedicineAbuse at home and in your community, visit our Medicine Abuse Project website.

The post What DO I do with those extra meds? A few simple steps. appeared first on Partnership for Drug-Free Kids.

Categories: Bup Feeds

Endovascular treatment of infected brachial pseudoaneurysm in an intravenous drug abuser: a case report.

Buprenorphine Research (PubMed) - Mon, 07/06/2015 - 6:30am

Endovascular treatment of infected brachial pseudoaneurysm in an intravenous drug abuser: a case report.

Ann Vasc Surg. 2015 Jul 1;

Authors: Raluca B, Georg Y, Ramlugun D, Martinot M, Camin A, Matysiak L, Kretz B

Abstract
We report the case of a 36-year old male, admitted in the emergency room with a non ruptured brachial pseudoaneurysm after Buprenorphine injection, with no signs of distal acute ischemia. After endovascular treatment with a nitinol covered stent associated with adapted antibiotherapy and 35 days of hospitalizations, the patient was discharged with good short results but stent need to be removed at 6 months for thrombosis and partial exposure through the wound.

PMID: 26142880 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Categories: Bup Feeds

Opioids for field procedures in equine practice.

Buprenorphine Research (PubMed) - Sat, 07/04/2015 - 7:30am
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Opioids for field procedures in equine practice.

Vet Rec. 2014 Dec 20-27;175(24):621-2

Authors: Schauvliege S

PMID: 25523998 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Bup Feeds

Pronociceptive and Antinociceptive Effects of Buprenorphine in the Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn Cover a Dose Range of Four Orders of Magnitude.

Buprenorphine Research (PubMed) - Fri, 07/03/2015 - 7:30am

Pronociceptive and Antinociceptive Effects of Buprenorphine in the Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn Cover a Dose Range of Four Orders of Magnitude.

J Neurosci. 2015 Jul 1;35(26):9580-9594

Authors: Gerhold KJ, Drdla-Schutting R, Honsek SD, Forsthuber L, Sandkühler J

Abstract
Due to its distinct pharmacological profile and lower incidence of adverse events compared with other opioids, buprenorphine is considered a safe option for pain and substitution therapy. However, despite its wide clinical use, little is known about the synaptic effects of buprenorphine in nociceptive pathways. Here, we demonstrate dose-dependent, bimodal effects of buprenorphine on transmission at C-fiber synapses in rat spinal cord dorsal horn in vivo. At an analgesically active dose of 1500 μg·kg(-1), buprenorphine reduced the strength of spinal C-fiber synapses. This depression required activation of spinal opioid receptors, putatively μ1-opioid receptors, as indicated by its sensitivity to spinal naloxone and to the selective μ1-opioid receptor antagonist naloxonazine. In contrast, a 15,000-fold lower dose of buprenorphine (0.1 μg·kg(-1)), which caused thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in behaving animals, induced an enhancement of transmission at spinal C-fiber synapses. The ultra-low-dose buprenorphine-induced synaptic facilitation was mediated by supraspinal naloxonazine-insensitive, but CTOP-sensitive μ-opioid receptors, descending serotonergic pathways, and activation of spinal glial cells. Selective inhibition of spinal 5-hydroxytryptamine-2 receptors (5-HT2Rs), putatively located on spinal astrocytes, abolished both the induction of synaptic facilitation and the hyperalgesia elicited by ultra-low-dose buprenorphine. Our study revealed that buprenorphine mediates its modulatory effects on transmission at spinal C-fiber synapses by dose dependently acting on distinct μ-opioid receptor subtypes located at different levels of the neuraxis.

PMID: 26134641 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Categories: Bup Feeds

Assessment of Drug-Drug Interactions Between Daclatasvir and Methadone or Buprenorphine/Naloxone.

Buprenorphine Research (PubMed) - Wed, 07/01/2015 - 8:30am
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Assessment of Drug-Drug Interactions Between Daclatasvir and Methadone or Buprenorphine/Naloxone.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2015 Jun 29;

Authors: Garimella T, Wang R, Luo WL, Wastall P, Kandoussi H, DeMicco M, Bruce RD, Hwang C, Bertz R, Bifano M

Abstract
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is common among people who inject drugs, including those managed with maintenance opioids. Pharmacokinetic interactions between opioids and emerging oral HCV antivirals merit evaluation. Daclatasvir is a potent pangenotypic inhibitor of the HCV NS5A replication complex recently approved for HCV treatment in Europe and Japan in combination with other antivirals. The effect of steady-state daclatasvir (60 mg daily) on stable plasma exposure to oral opioids was assessed in HCV-uninfected subjects receiving methadone (40-120 mg; N=14) or buprenorphine plus naloxone (8-24 mg plus 2-6 mg; N=11). No relevant interaction was inferred if the 90% confidence interval (90%CI) of the geometric mean ratio (GMR) of opioid area under the plasma concentration-time curve over the dosing interval (AUCτ) or maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) with versus without daclatasvir was within literature-derived ranges of 0.7-1.43 (R- and S-methadone) or 0.5-2.0 (buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine). Dose-normalized AUCτ for R-methadone (GMR 1.08; 90%CI 0.94-1.24), S-methadone (1.13; 0.99-1.30) and buprenorphine (1.37; 1.24-1.52) were within the no-effect range. Norbuprenorphine AUCτ was slightly elevated in the primary analysis (GMR 1.62; 1.30-2.02) but within the no-effect range in a supplementary analysis of all evaluable subjects. Dose-normalized Cmax for both methadone enantiomers, buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine, were within the no-effect range. Standardized assessments of opioid pharmacodynamics were unchanged throughout daclatasvir administration with methadone or buprenorphine. Daclatasvir pharmacokinetics were similar to historical data. Coadministration of daclatasvir and opioids was generally well tolerated. In conclusion, these data suggest that daclatasvir can be administered with buprenorphine or methadone without dose adjustments.

PMID: 26124175 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Categories: Bup Feeds

Diffusion and diversion of suboxone: an exploration of illicit street opioid selling.

Buprenorphine Research (PubMed) - Tue, 06/30/2015 - 6:30am
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Diffusion and diversion of suboxone: an exploration of illicit street opioid selling.

J Addict Dis. 2014;33(3):177-86

Authors: Furst RT

Abstract
Interviews with fourteen opioid retail pill sellers provides an exploration into the diversion and diffusion of Suboxone to recreational ("week-end warriors") drug users. The use of social media and electronic devices enables the diffusion of Suboxone to dependent and non-dependent opiate/opioid drug abusers. Overprescribing by physicians and prescribing in drug treatment settings fuels the diversion of Suboxone. The diversion and the diffusion of Suboxone have the potential to delay entrance into drug treatment and promote the misuse of the drug by both dependent opiate/opioid drug abusers and recreational users. The dilemma posed by Suboxone maintenance treatment will not be easily addressed or mitigated in the near future.

PMID: 25115236 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Bup Feeds

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