Concluding statement - neuropharmacological basis and clinical rationale for control of transdermal buprenorphine as a step II analgesic.

Buprenorphine Research (PubMed) - Sat, 06/13/2015 - 6:00am

Concluding statement - neuropharmacological basis and clinical rationale for control of transdermal buprenorphine as a step II analgesic.

Acta Anaesthesiol Taiwan. 2015 Jun 8;

Authors: Henningfield JE, Sun WZ

Abstract
In this commentary on the medical use and regulation of transdermal buprenorphine we bring together our complimentary perspectives on the neuropharmacology of analgesics (Dr. Henningfield) and clinical medicine to address the needs of people with pain (Dr. Sun). Together, the neuropharmacology of buprenorphine, the clinical and abuse deterring benefits of the 7-day transdermal formulation, the low rates of harmful use and abuse detected in post-marketing surveillance studies, and the desirable clinical benefits in the elderly, in persons with compromised kidney function, and other populations support the regulation of buprenorphine comparable to tramadol-like analgesics. We support this approach and believe that it strikes the right balance of control to provide appropriate access to people with pain and their health providers, while still providing the basis for deterring harmful use and abuse.

PMID: 26068437 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Categories: Bup Feeds

National and State Treatment Need and Capacity for Opioid Agonist Medication-Assisted Treatment.

Buprenorphine Research (PubMed) - Sat, 06/13/2015 - 6:00am

National and State Treatment Need and Capacity for Opioid Agonist Medication-Assisted Treatment.

Am J Public Health. 2015 Jun 11;:e1-e9

Authors: Jones CM, Campopiano M, Baldwin G, McCance-Katz E

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We estimated national and state trends in opioid agonist medication-assisted treatment (OA-MAT) need and capacity to identify gaps and inform policy decisions.
METHODS: We generated national and state rates of past-year opioid abuse or dependence, maximum potential buprenorphine treatment capacity, number of patients receiving methadone from opioid treatment programs (OTPs), and the percentage of OTPs operating at 80% capacity or more using Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration data.
RESULTS: Nationally, in 2012, the rate of opioid abuse or dependence was 891.8 per 100 000 people aged 12 years or older compared with national rates of maximum potential buprenorphine treatment capacity and patients receiving methadone in OTPs of, respectively, 420.3 and 119.9. Among states and the District of Columbia, 96% had opioid abuse or dependence rates higher than their buprenorphine treatment capacity rates; 37% had a gap of at least 5 per 1000 people. Thirty-eight states (77.6%) reported at least 75% of their OTPs were operating at 80% capacity or more.
CONCLUSIONS: Significant gaps between treatment need and capacity exist at the state and national levels. Strategies to increase the number of OA-MAT providers are needed. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print June 11, 2015: e1-e9. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2015.302664).

PMID: 26066931 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Categories: Bup Feeds

When Your College Kid’s Home for the Summer

Drug and Alcohol News (JoinTogether.com) - Fri, 06/12/2015 - 9:05am

Has your college kid moved back home for the summer? Your family is likely thrilled to have her under your roof again, but may be experiencing a bit of tension, fueled by your undergrad’s emotional state.

Perhaps she’s struggling with her loss of independence, missing college friends, disappointed that high-school friendships aren’t what they used to be, uninspired at her summer job, frustrated to have to follow your rules or just really, really bored.

We asked parenting expert Sue Scheff to help parents better understand the state of mind of their living-at-home-again college student, and how they might help their child best cope and stay healthy and safe during this time of transition. She shared four things to keep in mind.

1. Your child is probably a bit anxious about being home.

Teenagers usually go off to college with a sense of excitement about the prospect of being on their own. It’s often their first taste of freedom from their parent. Your teen has spent a year in a more unstructured and unsupervised environment. She has new friends you probably don’t know. It was a year of growth for her and, in reality, you may not know your child as well as you used to.  Now she’s coming home to a family that expects her to be the same person she was when you dropped her off at school almost a year earlier.  For all of these reasons, it’s common for her to be a bit anxious about coming home.

One way to ease your teen’s anxiety is to talk with her about what she’s going through. Remain calm, and really listen to what she has to say. Put yourself in her shoes and try to think about how you felt when you were her age. Remember to ask lots of open-ended questions (questions designed to elicit more than just a “yes” or “no” response) that keep conversations moving in the right direction.

2. Establish mutual respect by discussing the rules together

Respect is a two-way street.  Make it clear that you’ll respect her independence and will make allowances as she is now maturing into an adult, however, she has to respect your household rules too.  Instead of getting caught up in a power play, remain calm and curious and treat her with the respect she wants in return.

As soon as your college kid arrives home, sit down and negotiate the household rules and what you expect from her.  Be sure to discuss curfews, chores, if you expect her to get a summer job, as well as your feelings about drinking and substance use. Instead of lecturing, have a conversation, respect her opinion and let you’re her feel heard. You don’t have to agree to her every request, but giving her a voice will make her feel understood.

Wondering how to talk to your teen about marijuana? Download our Marijuana Talk Kit to find out.

Also, use this as an opportunity for your teen to establish what she expects from you in return regarding her own personal wishes. Having an immediate conversation at the beginning of the summer can prevent confrontations during her stay at home.

3.  Help your child learn coping skills

Your teen may be struggling to figure out where she belongs. Her friends may have changed, and maybe things aren’t exactly the way she thought they would be. Having a conversation with a sense of understanding and compassion can let her know you are on her side.

Whatever it is she’s facing, help her understand that not everything in life will go the way we want it to.  Learning healthy coping skills is an important part of being an adult. And using alcohol or drugs to cope with emotional pain is not a solution.

Show your concern and ask permission to help her find healthy alternatives to dealing with difficult feelings than turning to drugs. Sit down with your teen and have her make a list of positive skills to implement in her day-to-day life while at home. This could be whatever she enjoys, including sports, yoga, listening to music, hiking, dancing or even trying out a new activity. Volunteering is a great way to fill time and give back to others, and also instills self-esteem to help make better choices.

However, it’s important to stay alert to possible mental health issues. Between the ages of 18 and 25 are when a lot of disorders, like anxiety, can develop. There is a strong link between mental and physical health issues and the use of drugs and alcohol. Be sure to find mental health resources for your child if needed.

4. If she’s drinking and using drugs.

If you suspect your teen has a substance abuse problem, call the Partnership’s Toll-Free Helpline (1-855-DRUGFREE) to speak with a trained specialist.

Here are expert tips on what to do if you know your 19-25-year-old is using.

Don’t overlook the prescription drugs in your home, which teens often have easy access to and can abuse. Be sure your prescription medicines are secured and that expired/unused medicines in your home are properly disposed of.

It is important to note that car crashes are the leading cause of death for US teens. And, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the period between Memorial Day and Labor Day is the deadliest for drivers ages 15-20. Drinking and driving, and texting while driving, are incredibly dangerous. Make it clear to your child this behavior is unacceptable, and that if she needs a ride or help getting out of a situation, you are there for her.

Lastly, remind her that you love her and care about her and are there to talk about these – or any other – issues that she’s dealing with. It’s not all about the topic of drinking, drug use and safety – it’s about maintaining a generally healthy, supportive relationship. Your child needs to know that if any problems or difficult situations arise, she can always turn to you for help –  whether she’s away at college or back at home.

Thank you to Sue Scheff for her sharing her insights. Sue is an author, parent advocate and cyber advocate. As founder and president of Parents’ Universal Resource Experts Inc. (P.U.R.E., 2001), Sue is concerned with parents helping parents and promoting awareness of cyberbullying and other online issues. Sue uses her own personal experiences to assist other parents who face the same challenges she faced while searching for a reliable program for her own daughter during her troubled teenage years. Over the past decade, P.U.R.E. has gained both national and international recognition for its success in helping thousands of parents locate safe and effective therapeutic schools and programs for their at-risk teens.

And special thanks to Grayson Ponti for his help in preparing this post.

 

The post When Your College Kid’s Home for the Summer appeared first on Partnership for Drug-Free Kids.

Categories: Bup Feeds

Growth In Buprenorphine Waivers For Physicians Increased Potential Access To Opioid Agonist Treatment, 2002-11.

Buprenorphine Research (PubMed) - Wed, 06/10/2015 - 8:00am
Related Articles

Growth In Buprenorphine Waivers For Physicians Increased Potential Access To Opioid Agonist Treatment, 2002-11.

Health Aff (Millwood). 2015 Jun 1;34(6):1028-34

Authors: Dick AW, Pacula RL, Gordon AJ, Sorbero M, Burns RM, Leslie D, Stein BD

Abstract
Opioid use disorders are a significant public health problem, affecting two million people in the United States. Treatment with buprenorphine, methadone, or both is predominantly offered in methadone clinics, yet many people do not receive the treatment they need. In 2002 the Food and Drug Administration approved buprenorphine for prescription by physicians who completed a course and received a waiver from the Drug Enforcement Administration, exempting them from requirements in the Controlled Substances Act. To determine the waiver program's impact on the availability of opioid agonist treatment, we analyzed data for the period 2002-11 to identify counties with opioid treatment shortages. We found that the percentage of counties with a shortage of waivered physicians fell sharply, from 98.9 percent in 2002 to 46.8 percent in 2011. As a result, the percentage of the US population residing in what we classified as opioid treatment shortage counties declined from 48.6 percent in 2002 to 10.4 percent in 2011. These findings suggest that the increase in waivered physicians has dramatically increased potential access to opioid agonist treatment. Policy makers should focus their efforts on further increasing the number and geographical distribution of physicians, particularly in more rural counties, where prescription opioid misuse is rapidly growing.

PMID: 26056209 [PubMed - in process]

Categories: Bup Feeds

A New Formulation of Buprenorphine/Naloxone.

Buprenorphine Research (PubMed) - Tue, 06/09/2015 - 9:00am

A New Formulation of Buprenorphine/Naloxone.

J Addict Nurs. 2015 Apr-Jun;26(2):104-105

Authors:

PMID: 26053085 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Categories: Bup Feeds

Do We Really Need to Continue Pharmacotherapy for Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) Indefinitely?

Buprenorphine Research (PubMed) - Tue, 06/09/2015 - 9:00am

Do We Really Need to Continue Pharmacotherapy for Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) Indefinitely?

J Reward Defic Syndr. 2015;1(1):16-19

Authors: Badgaiyan RD, Sinha S, Blum K

Abstract
It is unclear whether pharmacotherapy for opioid use disorder (OUD) should be continued for short or long-term. Before introduction of buprenorphine, methadone was the primary pharmacotherapy for OUD in the United States. Because of its specific pharmacokinetic properties methadone was recommended for long-term use with some justification. Introduction of buprenorphine however has altered the treatment protocol because of milder adverse effects and withdrawal symptoms. The adverse effects of buprenorphine are milder but not negligible. Therefore, indefinite prescription is justified only if there is a significant benefit. Studies that have compared short and long-term treatment of buprenorphine protocols do not show a significant benefit of long-term treatment over relatively short-term (few months) treatment protocols. Obviously, the ultra short-term treatment lasting a few days has very little or no benefit on long-term treatment of buprenorphine protocols that use buprenorphine for 3 to 9 months is comparable to that of the long-term (years to lifetime) treatment without financial and medical consequences of the long-term treatment.

PMID: 26052555 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Categories: Bup Feeds

An international perspective on using opioid substitution treatment to improve hepatitis C prevention and care for people who inject drugs: Structural barriers and public health potential.

Buprenorphine Research (PubMed) - Tue, 06/09/2015 - 9:00am

An international perspective on using opioid substitution treatment to improve hepatitis C prevention and care for people who inject drugs: Structural barriers and public health potential.

Int J Drug Policy. 2015 Apr 27;

Authors: Perlman DC, Jordan AE, Uuskula A, Huong DT, Masson CL, Schackman BR, Des Jarlais DC

Abstract
People who inject drugs (PWID) are central to the hepatitis C virus (HCV) epidemic. Opioid substitution treatment (OST) of opioid dependence has the potential to play a significant role in the public health response to HCV by serving as an HCV prevention intervention, by treating non-injection opioid dependent people who might otherwise transition to non-sterile drug injection, and by serving as a platform to engage HCV infected PWID in the HCV care continuum and link them to HCV treatment. This paper examines programmatic, structural and policy considerations for using OST as a platform to improve the HCV prevention and care continuum in 3 countries-the United States, Estonia and Viet Nam. In each country a range of interconnected factors affects the use OST as a component of HCV control. These factors include (1) that OST is not yet provided on the scale needed to adequately address illicit opioid dependence, (2) inconsistent use of OST as a platform for HCV services, (3) high costs of HCV treatment and health insurance policies that affect access to both OST and HCV treatment, and (4) the stigmatization of drug use. We see the following as important for controlling HCV transmission among PWID: (1) maintaining current HIV prevention efforts, (2) expanding efforts to reduce the stigmatization of drug use, (3) expanding use of OST as part of a coordinated public health approach to opioid dependence, HIV prevention, and HCV control efforts, (4) reductions in HCV treatment costs and expanded health system coverage to allow population level HCV treatment as prevention and OST as needed. The global expansion of OST and use of OST as a platform for HCV services should be feasible next steps in the public health response to the HCV epidemic, and is likely to be critical to efforts to eliminate or eradicate HCV.

PMID: 26050614 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Categories: Bup Feeds

Hepatitis C virus infection and pain sensitivity in patients on methadone or buprenorphine maintenance therapy for opioid use disorders.

Buprenorphine Research (PubMed) - Sun, 06/07/2015 - 8:30am

Hepatitis C virus infection and pain sensitivity in patients on methadone or buprenorphine maintenance therapy for opioid use disorders.

Drug Alcohol Depend. 2015 May 22;

Authors: Tsui JI, Lira MC, Cheng DM, Winter MR, Alford DP, Liebschutz JM, Mao J, Edwards RR, Samet JH

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Patients with opioid use disorders on opioid agonist therapy (OAT) have lower pain tolerance compared to controls. While chronic viral infections such as HCV and HIV have been associated with chronic pain in this population, no studies have examined their impact on pain sensitivity.
METHODS: We recruited 106 adults (41 uninfected controls; 40 HCV mono-infected; and 25 HCV/HIV co-infected) on buprenorphine or methadone to assess whether HCV infection (with or without HIV) was associated with increased experimental pain sensitivity and self-reported pain. The primary outcome was cold pain tolerance assessed by cold-pressor test. Secondary outcomes were cold pain thresholds, wind-up ratios to repetitive mechanical stimulation (i.e., temporal summation) and acute and chronic pain. Multivariable regression models evaluated associations between viral infection status and outcomes, adjusting for other factors.
RESULTS: No significant differences were detected across groups for primary or secondary outcomes. Adjusted mean cold pain tolerance was 25.7 (uninfected controls) vs. 26.8 (HCV mono-infection) vs. 25.3 (HCV/HIV co-infection) seconds (global p-value=0.93). Current pain appeared more prevalent among HCV mono-infected (93%) compared to HCV/HIV co-infected participants (76%) and uninfected controls (80%), as did chronic pain (77% vs. 64% vs. 61%, respectively). However, differences were not statistically significant in multivariable models.
CONCLUSION: This study did not detect an association between HCV infection and increased sensitivity to pain among adults with and without HIV who were treated with buprenorphine or methadone for opioid use disorders. Results reinforce that pain and hyperalgesia are common problems in this population.

PMID: 26048638 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Categories: Bup Feeds

A Retrospective Evaluation of Inpatient Transfer from High-Dose Methadone to Buprenorphine Substitution Therapy.

Buprenorphine Research (PubMed) - Sun, 06/07/2015 - 8:30am

A Retrospective Evaluation of Inpatient Transfer from High-Dose Methadone to Buprenorphine Substitution Therapy.

J Subst Abuse Treat. 2015 May 13;

Authors: Oretti R

Abstract
The product license of buprenorphine/naloxone for opioid substitution therapy indicates reducing methadone concentrations to 30mg or less per day for a minimum of 1week before transferring patients to buprenorphine and no sooner than 24hours after the last methadone dose, because of the risk of precipitated withdrawal and a corresponding high risk of relapse to opioid use. There are few studies describing high-dose methadone transfers. This retrospective case review assessed the feasibility of transferring patients on methadone doses above 30mg/day to buprenorphine or buprenorphine/naloxone in the inpatient setting. Six of seven patients on 60-120mg/day of methadone successfully completed the transfer, and four cases tested negative for opiates at long-term follow-up (6-15 months). This suggests that methadone transfer to buprenorphine can be performed rapidly without the need to taper methadone doses in patients indicated for a therapeutic switch. This small study is hypothesis-generating; larger, well-designed trials are needed to define a protocol that can be used routinely to improve and widen transfers to buprenorphine when indicated.

PMID: 26048187 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Categories: Bup Feeds

Combined administration of buprenorphine and naltrexone produces antidepressant-like effects in mice.

Buprenorphine Research (PubMed) - Sat, 06/06/2015 - 6:30am
Related Articles

Combined administration of buprenorphine and naltrexone produces antidepressant-like effects in mice.

J Psychopharmacol. 2015 Jun 4;

Authors: Almatroudi A, Husbands SM, Bailey CP, Bailey SJ

Abstract
Opiates have been used historically for the treatment of depression. Renewed interest in the use of opiates as antidepressants has focused on the development of kappa opioid receptor (κ-receptor) antagonists. Buprenorphine acts as a partial µ-opioid receptor agonist and a κ-receptor antagonist. By combining buprenorphine with the opioid antagonist naltrexone, the activation of µ-opioid receptors will be reduced and the κ-antagonist properties enhanced. We have established that a combination dose of buprenorphine (1 mg/kg) with naltrexone (1 mg/kg) functions as a short-acting κ-antagonist in the mouse tail withdrawal test. Furthermore, this dose combination is neither rewarding nor aversive in the conditioned place preference paradigm, and is without significant locomotor effects. We have shown for the first time that systemic co-administration of buprenorphine (1 mg/kg) with naltrexone (1 mg/kg) in CD-1 mice produced an antidepressant-like response in behaviours in both the forced swim test and novelty induced hypophagia task. Behaviours in the elevated plus maze and light dark box were not significantly altered by treatment with buprenorphine alone, or in combination with naltrexone. We propose that the combination of buprenorphine with naltrexone represents a novel, and potentially a readily translatable approach, to the treatment of depression.

PMID: 26045511 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Categories: Bup Feeds

Enucleation for treating rodent ocular disease.

Buprenorphine Research (PubMed) - Sat, 06/06/2015 - 6:30am
Related Articles

Enucleation for treating rodent ocular disease.

J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci. 2015;54(3):328-32

Authors: Wilding LA, Uchihashi M, Bergin IL, Nowland MH

Abstract
Our standard of care for rodent corneal lesions previously included treatment of the primary lesion, application of topical NSAIDs, and systemic NSAIDs in severe cases. When intensive medical management was unsuccessful, animals were euthanized, leading to premature loss of valuable genetically modified animals and those on long-term studies. We investigated enucleation surgery as a treatment for 15 cases of rodent corneal disease that did not respond to medical management. Enucleation was performed under isoflurane anesthesia and involved removal of the globe, extensive hemostasis, and packing the orbital space with absorbable gelatin sponge. The lid margins were closed by tarsorrhaphy and tissue glue. Analgesia was provided by using buprenorphine preoperatively and carprofen chew tabs postoperatively. To date, we have a 100% success rate with this procedure (n = 20; 15 clinically affected rodents [2 rats, 13 mice], 5 healthy controls), which included a 60-d follow-up period. The single complication involved dehiscence of the tarsorrhaphy site and was repaired by trimming the lid margins to provide fresh tissue for closure. Histologic examination at both 1 and 3 mo after surgery revealed no evidence of infection of the enucleation site. Enucleation in rodents is a straightforward procedure that represents a refinement to our current standard of care for rodents, does not cause significant inflammation of remaining periocular structures, and has reduced the number of animals euthanized prior to study endpoint because of severe ocular lesions.

PMID: 26045460 [PubMed - in process]

Categories: Bup Feeds

Effects of Dexmedetomidine and Ketamine-Dexmedetomidine with and without Buprenorphine on Corticoadrenal Function in Rabbits.

Buprenorphine Research (PubMed) - Sat, 06/06/2015 - 6:30am
Related Articles

Effects of Dexmedetomidine and Ketamine-Dexmedetomidine with and without Buprenorphine on Corticoadrenal Function in Rabbits.

J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci. 2015;54(3):299-303

Authors: González-Gil A, Villa A, Millán P, Martínez-Fernández L, Illera JC

Abstract
Anesthetics may influence adrenal function and consequently alter serum glucocorticoid concentrations, leading to erroneous interpretations of results from anesthetized rabbits. However, decreases in glucocorticoid concentrations may be advantageous in protocols designed to minimize the stress response to surgery. This study characterized the variations in adrenocortical function based on changes in corticosterone and cortisol levels after various doses and combinations of dexmedetomidine, ketamine, and buprenorphine. Each rabbit received all treatments with a minimal interexperiment interval of 10 d. Rabbits were allocated to 7 groups (n = 10 per group) and received either 1 mL saline solution; dexmedetomidine at 0.05, 0.15, or 0.25 mg/kg; ketamine (35 mg/kg) and dexmedetomidine (0.25 mg/kg) without or with buprenorphine (0.03 mg/kg); or ketamine (35 mg/kg) and buprenorphine (0.03 mg/kg). Blood was sampled before drug administration and at 10, 30, 60, and 120 min and 24 h afterward. Serum glucocorticoid levels fell in all treatment groups except the one receiving ketamine-dexmedetomidine; in that group, serum glucocorticoids increased. Rabbits that received ketamine-dexmedetomidine-buprenorphine had the lowest serum glucocorticoid levels overall. In conclusion, dexmedetomidine reduces glucocorticoid secretion in rabbits but, when combined with ketamine, increases corticosterone and cortisol levels as well as heart and respiratory rates. The addition of buprenorphine to the ketamine-dexmedetomidine mixture reduces serum glucocorticoid levels. The influence of anesthetic drugs should be considered when designing a protocol to minimize the glucocorticoid response to surgery or when measuring glucocorticoid levels in rabbits.

PMID: 26045456 [PubMed - in process]

Categories: Bup Feeds

IL-1 receptor antagonist improves morphine and buprenorphine efficacy in a rat neuropathic pain model.

Buprenorphine Research (PubMed) - Sat, 06/06/2015 - 6:30am
Related Articles

IL-1 receptor antagonist improves morphine and buprenorphine efficacy in a rat neuropathic pain model.

Eur J Pharmacol. 2015 Jun 1;

Authors: Pilat D, Rojewska E, Jurga AM, Piotrowska A, Makuch W, Przewlocka B, Mika J

Abstract
An interesting research and therapeutic problem is the reduced beneficial efficacy of opioids in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The present study sought to investigate the potential role of IL-1 family members in this phenomenon. We studied the time course of changes in IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-1 receptor type I and IL-1 receptor antagonist mRNA and protein levels experienced by rats after chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve using qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. In CCI-exposed rats, spinal levels of IL-1alpha mRNA were slightly downregulated on the 7(th) day, and protein levels were not changed on the 7(th) and 14(th) days. Levels of IL-1 receptor antagonist and IL-1 receptor type I were slightly upregulated in the ipsilateral part of the spinal cord on the 7(th) and 14(th) days; however, protein levels were not changed at those time points. Interestingly, we observed that IL-1beta mRNA and protein levels were strongly elevated in the ipsilateral part of the dorsal spinal cord on the 7(th) and 14(th) days following CCI. Moreover, in rats exposed to a single intrathecal administration of an IL-1 receptor antagonist (100 ng i.t.) on the 7(th) and 14(th) day following CCI, symptoms of neuropathic pain were attenuated, and the analgesic effects of morphine (2.5µg i.t.) and buprenorphine (2.5µg i.t.) were enhanced. In summary, restoration of the analgesic activity of morphine and buprenorphine by blockade of IL-1 signaling suggests that increased IL-1beta responses may account for the decreased analgesic efficacy of opioids observed in the treatment of neuropathy.

PMID: 26043968 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Categories: Bup Feeds

Your Child Lied. Now What?

Drug and Alcohol News (JoinTogether.com) - Wed, 06/03/2015 - 2:54pm

So, you just caught your teen in a lie. Your instinct may be to lose your cool: to panic, feel hurt and maybe yell at your child. But before you let your emotions get the best of you, take a deep breath. It is important to think about why your child is lying – and then use some important conversation skills to talk with your teen before you impart a consequence.

First, understand that all people – including teens – usually lie in order to avoid something. That can be a feeling, a reaction, a perception or a consequence.

Second, before you confront your child, it’s just as crucial to determine the underlying reason behind the lie as it is to address the lie itself. Think about this: why do you think your teen was dishonest with you? Was it because he didn’t want to worry or upset you? Because he knew you’d get angry and present a serious consequence? Or maybe he was trying to avoid feelings of shame or guilt in order to get away with something that he knew you wouldn’t approve of? Trying to understand this will help you approach the conversation with a clear perspective.

Remember: Just because your teen lied doesn’t mean your teen is a bad person. If your teen equates lying with being a bad person, this can actually facilitate additional distrust and cause even more lies down the road.

Third, to have an open and honest conversation with your teen, try to remain calm, curious and objective. Yes, this is difficult – but the more you can try to suppress the personal sting you feel after being lied to, the better position you will be in to get your teen to talk with you. Do your best to avoid finger-pointing and accusations that will shame your teen, and instead try something like this:

“You said you had only smoked weed once, but I know that isn’t true. Why didn’t you feel like you could tell me the truth about that?” You can also ask questions like, “What were you trying to accomplish by lying?”

Or: “What can I do to help you feel more comfortable telling me the truth next time?”

These questions get to the heart of why the lie happened, and can help you understand what you need to look out for in the future.

Finally, once you have talked about the reason behind the behavior you can then explain the consequence. Be sure to think about what this might be beforehand, so that you can clearly communicate the reasoning behind it and be sure that he understands why you chose it and why the consequence is important. The consequence should fit the violation, and should be specific. In other words, try not to make the emotion around the situation (shaming, name-calling) become the consequence itself.

The post Your Child Lied. Now What? appeared first on Partnership for Drug-Free Kids.

Categories: Bup Feeds

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